chocolate

Chocosketch, 3d chocolate printer by Rokit

Last month we got the chance to visit the headquarters of Rokit in Seoul South Korea. Thanks to Shane we got to know more about the and their 3d chocolate printer, Chocosketch.

During our visit we got the chance to see the printer in action, taste its prints and get an overview of the features.

Printing Chocolate

Taste

Overview

Intro

The Chocosketch is the chocolate Desktop 3d printer from Rokit. Rokit is a South Korean 3d printing company with printers that range from desktop to professional.

DSC01950

Overview

The build up volume for the printer is 210 x 120 x 70 mm, and the overall dimensions are 454 x 300 x 500 mm. It has a clear door locked with magnets for easy access to the interior.

 

Materials

The printer works with syringes filled with Chocolate. Rokit provides 3 types of chocolate that has been tested. Those are white, milk and dark. You can use your own material although you would need to tweak the configuration parameters to make sure it works properly.

DSC01940

Preheat

The printer has a preheat station in the inner left side of the printer, where cartridges can be preheated while printing.

This is especially good if you plan to print multiple or big items that might require more than one syringe of chocolate.

DSC01953

Printing plate

The build plate is made out of stainless steel, what makes it pretty easy to wipe out. Although It is fixed, so don’t expect to pop it into the dishwasher. Pro tip: for that use some cooking or wax paper, pro tip use some oil to stick it to the plate.

DSC01951

Cooling

3d chocolate prints are possible by controlling the temperature. For that the the Chocosketch has a fan that forces air circulation. There is no active cooling system . Proper air circulation makes sure the chocolate sets and the nozzle does not get clogged.

Extruder

The printer has a removable top for easy access to the extruder, to load and unload the syringes.

DSC01966

The extruder itself works similarly to the RichRap syringe extruder, where a belt pushes down the plunger. Obviously it includes a heating system that keeps all the syringe warm including the nozzle.

DSC01960

Printing

There is 3d different ways to send files to the printer. Using WIFI, USB or SD-Card.

Price and contact

The printer retails for about 2100$(depending on the country) and each preloaded syringe for about 5$.

For more information make sure to contact with Rokit.

DSC01963
Thanks Rokit and specially Shane for letting us visit and get a closer view of the printer.

3DC Instructables Roundup pt 2

Water Chocolate Mousse

Using a recipe from Hervé This and “accidentally” printing the AirBnb logo… was an experience Luis shared through Instructables using Chocolate Mousse.  It is actually a lot of fun to print with and builds anticipation with every layer.  As you can see from the vid below.. which is a print made from a design app created by Jaime  🙂

Pinya3: a 3D food printing platform release

I think we all understand at this point in the evolution of 3DFP that if you want to print food your are most likely going to have to make your own hardware and sometimes software as well.  Luis has created and released the Pinya3: a 3D food printing platform to make your entry into 3DFP so much easier.  This printer was designed with the kitchen in mind; from the stainless steel parts to the actual size of the device as it was meant to fit under the cabinets on your kitchen counter.

Cartridge Extruder

You can’t 3D print food without an extruder can you? 3DIGITALCOOKS is really focused on you getting your 3DFP aspirations or ideas going.. and the Cartridge extruder on Instructables is one way that WILL help you get to the point where you can start working on prototypes of your food experiemnt.  Go check it, build your own and share your experience with us.

CocoJet first look by Hersheys and 3d Systems

CocoJet first look. Great surprise for the day. Thanks to a tip, we got to know that Hersheys was showing their CocoJet printer at Remake San Francisco.Without hesitating we head there and meet the great people from Hersheys and the CocoJet.

Here a video of the printer in action.

Special thanks to Jeff and Robert for answering patiantly our crazy questions. We were super excited!

IMG_5686

IMG_5691

IMG_5693

IMG_5694

IMG_5695

New 3d food printer: Choco Sketch by Rokit

Choco Sketch it is a new 3d Food Printer announced by Rokit. It is exclusively design for chocolate.

Choco sketch 3d food printer

Choco sketch 3d food printer

Here you can see a short video highly marketingized but with a Yoda printed sample.

Choco sketch chocolate print

Choco sketch chocolate print

More info on their Facebook and website!

Not much info about it, expected price is 2Million KRW what it is around 1600€. Seems their paste extruder would be available too.

Chocolate Chantilly

Chocolate Chantilly was part of a failed digital recipe that we are still working on it :(. But it is so great that we wanted to share it with you. Created by Hervé This. Chocolate Chantilly is a mousse of chocolate made just with chocolate and water. Easy and super delicious!

What better way to learn about that from Heston Blumenthal?

It is pretty straight forward, the higher content of cocoa solids the more moussy it will be. To Learn more check the references!

References:

Printing tips for chocolate

Printing with chocolate tends to end up in a completely mess at 3DC #HQ. Here are some printing tips for chocolate that we find useful for our doilies prints.

20141229_201239

Before any print or even preparing the chocolate make sure:

  • Precut enough baking paper
  • Make sure all your axis are properly adjusted (specially if you are tweaking the Z axis all the time like us!)
  • Prepare all your printing files in advance!
  • Prepare a napkin soak in water, we use this to stick the paper to our tile base
  • Make sure the printer is ready (connected)
  • Make sure you have a syringe, plunger and tip clean

After that… is time to melt the chocolate! For this particular print, we do not temper it, but that is up to you and your snappingness and shinyness addiction 🙂

To melt the chocolate using the microwave is preferred. Our “technique” relays on counting 15 every time the choco is heated up. Heat and stir as much as you need to melt all the chocolate. Stir in between heating runs.

Load the syringe, adjust the air pressure and hit print!

Another 3D Food printing adventure story 🙂